McGovern-Dole Leadership Award

Pleased to represent the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics with these colleagues to see Senator Bob Casey (PA) and Senator Jerry Moran (KS) receive this award presented by the World Food Program. Worldwide 815 million people suffer from hunger; 80% of expenditures to resolve hunger are spent in war zones (man-made conflict areas). Humanitarian, developmental and educational aid needed. 

Gear Up for Kid's Eat Right and Back to School Month

I Want that One!

A is for Apple; An Apple for the Teacher; An Apple a Day Keeps the Doctor Away!

Apples are at their peak freshness this time of year. And with so many varieties, and more than one way to eat an apple, there is sure to be one you and your kids will like: Red and Golden Delicious, Gala, Jazz, Pink Lady, McIntosh, Braeburn, Jonagold, etc. etc. Grab the kids and visit a local orchard for some great family fun, apple munching memories, and photo ops.

Apples are a good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin C and plant nutrients, and antioxidants that reduce inflammation and aging; decrease the risk of certain cancers; help regulate blood sugar levels; and keep that waistline from expanding at any age.

There are so many ways to eat an apple:

1.       For starters, eat an apple right out of your hand! Be sure to pack an apple in that insulated school cooler for snack or lunchtime sweetness.

2.       Ever make homemade applesauce? Why not give it a try?

3.       Caramel apples are a treat this time of year. This year try sprinkling apples with cinnamon and dipping them in almonds or reduced fat granola for extra crunch and heart health benefits.

4.       Apple pancakes and apple oatmeal muffins are a hit in my home this time of year.

5.       Add diced apple to your salad.

6.       Try a slice of apple on your turkey burger. Or a family favorite – apple on pizza for an alternative to pineapple.

7.       And sometimes, it’s just plain fun to cut an apple differently; either with an apple divider or an apple machine.

Any way you slice it, an apple adds up to big health benefits.

Want to live longer?

Happy to contribute to this article. Here are just a few more of my nutrition suggestions to living longer - wake up to whole grain toast topped with almond nut butter and sliced fresh strawberries; or homemade zucchini bread or blueberry muffins made with whole wheat pastry flour. Have shrimp cocktail at lunch, or add mandarin oranges to your salad. Grill shish kabobs or salmon for dinner. And always eat a veggie at every lunch and dinner!

Blueberry Crumble Bar

I love summertime! I love picking blueberries and tossing these memory-boosting berries on top of my oatmeal, in my yogurt, pancakes or muffins. RDN friend Sara Haas posted her Blueberry Crumble Bar recipe last month and I can’t wait to have one last taste of summer blueberries this weekend. Hope you’ll try this recipe, too! Thank you Sara for all your hard work on our KER project! #kidseatright #sarainthekitchen.           http://www.sarahaasrdn.com/blueberry-crumble-barsrecipe/     

August is Kids Eat Right Month

While the beginning of a new school year is upon us; the summer harvests are in. I hope you are enjoying the fresh fruits and vegetables available at the many local farmer's markets, restaurants, and grocery stores this time of year. 

From apples to zucchini, take the time to explore the different aromas, shapes, textures, colors and flavors of produce with your kids. Help their senses come alive. This will enable them to expand their palates, and help to minimize that 'picky eater' syndrome when it comes to fresh produce. 

1. Encourage your kids to select one new and different food from the fresh produce aisle during trips to the supermarket. What's that brown fuzzy fruit over there? A kiwi! Crisp, sweet sugar snap pea pods dipped in reduced fat ranch dressing or hummus make for a good snack. 

2. Use different utensils or kitchen gadgets to encourage kids to eat fruits or vegetables. A spiral apple slicer provides fun in the kitchen and a new, exciting way to eat an apple. 

3. Have kids put an apron on, use math skills to measure out ingredients, and practice cracking eggs into bowls as they make zucchini bread, blueberry muffins, carrot cake or even tomato topped brushetta. Enjoy the aroma of these fresh baked items. 

4. For a cool treat on a hot day take a refreshing break with a watermelon or mango smoothie.

5. Be sure to talk age appropriate facts with kids and educate them on colors, flavors, and simple nutrients in produce. Statements like 'these carrots make your eyes sparkle and help you to see better' deliver important messages to young children. 

With fresh produce the possibilities to share health, wellness, and fun with your children are endless; and the memories made together are priceless. #kidseatright #kidsinthekitchen

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day 2016

This group of medical professionals are health, food and nutrition experts that educate, motivate and encourage the public to live a quality life through quality food selection. We are advocates for the nutrition public policy that affects you at the dinner table; we help to determine the best nutrition for babies, and are there near the end of life; not to mention everything in between (from school nutrition, to chronic disease such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer; and yes tube fed patients). We are scientists and researchers at leading universities; and we work with the food and restaurant industry. We are sports nutritionists and eating disorder specialists. The list goes on and on. We are here to help you! Happy RDN day to my nutrition colleagues! If you know an RDN reach out today and send a hug, or share a helpful story or positive experience.  

 

Fiber Especially Important for Young Girls

From apples to pears; carrots to zucchini. For all the girls we love, eat your fruits and vegetables. According to a new study,

Women who eat more high-fiber foods during adolescence and young adulthood—especially lots of fruits and vegetables—may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fiber when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
— http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-02-higher-dietary-fiber-intake-young.html